The Philosopher’s Diamond

Better known as the Star of David, the Philosopher’s Diamond is an important symbol of the Jewish faith. Since I’m not Jewish, I didn’t think it applied to me, and I never took time to research the symbolism. I stumbled upon its meaning recently, though, and it doesn’t just apply, it enhances my comprehension of the relationship of God and His creation.

Christianity grew out of Judaism, and I (now) believe it is important to know not only the history described in the Old Testament, but the esoteric symbolism of the “old faith.” Understanding the meaning of the Philosopher’s Diamond has inspired me to investigate the Hebrew language as well, for I also learned that it contains fewer words than English, and therefore, each word has multiple meanings. English translations of the Bible may not be entirely accurate because of this. The best English Bible that addresses this issue is the Amplified Bible, which includes other word translations side-by-side within the text.

For example:

24 Then God said, “Let the earth bring forth living creatures according to (limited to, consistent with) their kind: livestock, crawling things, and wild animals of the earth according to their kinds”; and it was so [because He had spoken them into creation]. 25 So God made the wild animals of the earth according to their kind, and the cattle according to their kind, and everything that creeps and crawls on the earth according to its kind; and God saw that it was good (pleasing, useful) and He affirmed and sustained it.

 

26 Then God said, “Let Us (Father, Son, Holy Spirit) make man in Our image, according to Our likeness [not physical, but a spiritual personality and moral likeness]; and let them have complete authority over the fish of the sea, the birds of the air, the cattle, and over the entire earth, and over everything that creeps and crawls on the earth.

 

– Genesis 1:24-26

 

So what is this symbolism?

While each of the seven “wings” of the star symbolize something different, I want to focus on the idea that there are two triangles intertwined, and what that means. For the detailed Jewish symbolism, follow this link: http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/788679/jewish/What-Is-the-Mystical-Significance-of-the-Star-of-David.htm.

To clarify, I found this “epiphany” in a book called Numerology and the Divine Triangle (both topics I will be exploring over the coming weeks). Since I recognized the symbol of the Philosopher’s Diamond as the Star of David, I did some research to verify that the symbolism discussed in this book is the same as, or at least very similar to, the Jewish meaning. I found that it is.

Chapter 3, “God Geometrizes” begins with a discussion of simple shapes.

The circle:

The circle represents the Godhead, all that was, is, and ever shall be; spirit, the I Am; love because it encompasses, enfolds and contains; balance, because however you turn it, it maintains its shape; and justice, because it is in a state of perfect balance…A circle has no beginning and no end; it is infinite and endless. …It symbolizes eternity and the immortality of the soul. This is seen through the laws of nature and cyclicity. Planets revolve around the sun; nature repeats itself in cycles…

The vertical line:

The upright vertical line symbolically represents spirit descending into matter, or energy leaving the Godhead. It has masculine qualities; it is outgoing, dynamic, energetic, fiery, upright and commanding.

The horizontal line:

It represents the soul energy, the feminine, the receptive and absorptive qualities of mother earth. This line is an ancient symbol for matter and the material world.

The triangle:

The triangle is the first closed form that can be made with single lines. It represents the Trinity, Father-Son-Holy Ghost, father-mother-God, father-mother-child, spirit-soul-mind, super-conscious, subconscious, conscious.

Now on to the symbol at hand:

In the two interlaced triangles, the Philosopher’s Diamond or the Star of David, geometry captures the axiom, “As above, so below.”

 

We are made in the image of God. The upper triangle of the Philosopher’s Diamond is the father-mother-god which is reflected in the lower inverted triangle, father-mother-child. The upper triangle is the world of spirit, and the lower triangle is the world of matter. The Godhead from above is reflected in the material world below; therefore, what we see in the material world is merely a reflection of the truth. It is as if we are gazing into the depths of a cool forest pool, thinking the images we see are the only truth, although these images may be distorted by the wind rippling the surface of the water. We in the material body are merely observers of the shadows cast upon the walls of Plato’s cave. We live in a world of illusion and view things upside down.

 

Geometry validates the theory that we see only half the truth. …Each of the triangles has only one hundred eighty degrees, or half the degrees of a circle or square. As we have shown, a circle contains all truth and wisdom, it is the Godhead. But in the triangle, we only have half the truth. By adding these two triangles together, or one hundred eighty plus one hundred eighty, we arrive at three hundred sixty degrees, or all the truth. Symbolically situated in the lower inverted triangle, we must look to the spirit in the upper triangle to find all the truth, else we remain in a shadow land where the ill winds ripple our images and distort our vision of the truth.

From here the text analyzes the joining of the triangles into a square, what the square symbolizes, and how the Divine Triangle comes into existence, including what it means and how you can use it. I will get into those subjects next week.

God bless with mother earth’s bliss.

Source: Javane, Faith and Dusty Bunker. “Chapter 3: God Geometrizes.” Numerology and The Divine Triangle. 1979. pp. 44-45.

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